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There has long been a division in the profession of hypnotism between consulting (or clinical) hypnotists and stage hypnotists.  Many consulting hypnotists believe that stage hypnotists misrepresent the true value of hypnotism, and some would even say that stage hypnotists hurt the profession with their playful use of a skill set that can help people change their lives.  As a hypnotist who keeps a foot in each circle of hypnotism, I believe that there is tremendous value in the work stage hypnotists do, when they do it well.  In fact, I would argue that besides the internet, stage hypnotists are the greatest asset that the profession of hypnotism has today.
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I was fortunate to spend time discussing entrepreneurship in hypnotism with Helen Mitas and Jason Linett.  Besides being fantastic human beings, Helen and Jason are great hypnotists and savvy business people.  Each of them has built a hypnotism practice in less than a decade that generates nearly half a million dollars per year.  That puts them in the top 5% of hypnotism practitioners worldwide.

Wendy Merron trains consulting hypnotists in Pennsylvania.  She's a great person, and a dedicated professional.  She wanted her students to get some perspective from another practicing hypnotist, so she was kind enough to invite me to a Q&A with her class.

When I speak with people about my profession, I think it's important to be honest and open about all the different aspects of the work we do.  I think there's too much secret keeping and question dodging in our community, so when I get these opportunities to speak with students, I don't hold back.

I was disappointed, this morning, to find what I perceived as a dig at hypnotists in a post from one of my favorite TV hosts, Mike Rowe.  To see the full post from Mike Rowe, go here.  Given the greater context of the piece, I'm sure Mike was not making a big effort to slight the profession of hypnotism, but I think challenging these stereotypes, even when they are casually made, is important.